“I am saving money for college tuition by not paying Christian school tuition.”

“I am saving money for college tuition by not paying Christian school tuition.”

Actually, the costs to parents for not sending their child to a faithful Christian school are potentially much greater. First, Jesus forces us to answer this question about what parents think is most important for their children:

“For what does it profit a man to gain the whole world, and forfeit his soul?” (Mark 8:36)

In other words, what have you gained financially if you have lost your child’s soul for all eternity? No one can guarantee that a person will become a follower of Christ in any situation, but don’t you want to give your child the very best opportunity to hear God’s Word daily and believe it by attending a Christian school?

Then there are the monetary costs to consider that dramatically undermine the belief that parents are saving money by sending their children to a public school:

  • American parents are spending billions of dollars per year on private tutoring because their children are not being properly educated.
  • There is a quality of education cost when a student is not accepted into a quality college of choice because of a poor K-12 education.
  • There is a cost to parents when they are forced to pay at the college level for their children to take high school level remedial courses before they are allowed to take core level classes. This is a monetary cost and a time cost as obtaining a college degree may be stretched to five years or more.
  • There is a cost to parents of tens of thousands of dollars more in college loans when their child doesn’t qualify for scholarship or grant opportunities due to a lack of quality K-12 education.

All of the above may result in the significant monetary cost; however, the greatest cost could be the difference in pay between a job that requires higher educational qualifications and one that requires less over the 40 year period of work that is ahead for the graduate.

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